Sweetgreen: Uniquely Brilliant

Not every original idea becomes a success. There are thousands of restaurants opening every year, but most of them fail within six months. One has to be daring and clever to succeed in the food business. For Nathaniel Ru, Jonathan Neman, and Nicolas Jammet, opening a restaurant was an adventure.

What they’ve done with Sweetgreen revolutionized the food industry. They used technology long before most of the bigger food chains did. Now, with technology being a part of everything, a large percentage of their sales occur through their website and mobile app. That’s one thing Ru and the others wanted to Sweetgreen to do before anyone else. Read more: Sweetgreen Founder Interview – Nathaniel Ru | Business Insider and Sweetgreen | Wikipedia

With such a brilliant idea successfully succeeding in the food industry, the co-CEOs didn’t want to jeopardize their business by following other’s path. They continued to keep Sweetgreen original by making sure that even their office employees stayed close to customers.

At least five times a year, most of Sweetgreen’s corporate offices shut down, and the employees spend time working in the restaurants.

To further decentralize their headcount, the trio adopted a bicoastal method of management. Instead of one main office for them, they travel back and forth between offices growing the company one day at a time.

The bond between co-CEOs makes the brand the success that it is. They’ve been together since their college days when they met in an entrepreneurship class at Georgetown University. They instantly bonded over similar dreams about what kind of businesses they’d like to open one day. Learn more about Nathaniel Ru: http://www.psfk.com/2016/04/psfk-2016-how-sweetgreen-brought-healthy-and-delicious-to-the-busy-psfk-2016.html and http://nrn.com/power-list-2016-Jammet-Neman-Ru

After they graduated, those dreams were put to the test. It’s not easy opening any kind of business, so they researched what kind of business stood the best chance of surviving in the Georgetown area. The first thing they noticed: Georgetown had no healthy restaurant options.

Their success Georgetown taught them that there’s more to location than just picking a vacant space.

It’s important how they enter a market as well. That’s why they spend so much learning about the area instead of just popping up stores all over the city. They look for neighborhoods that have long-term potential.

Most food chains cluster near business districts and heavy foot traffic. That’s good for competitive marketing, but Sweetgreen isn’t a dine-and-dash eatery. They want people walking through the door all hours of the day.

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